Using Your Food Journal to Effect Positive Change in Nutrition Habits

You've been diligent on keeping a detailed food journal for a few weeks now, and, if you're like me, there probably are some surprising results! 

Without a journal, we rely on a memory that is selective at best. We congratulate ourselves for ordering a salad for lunch, and forget that it came with fried chicken strips and a half a cup of ranch dressing. We feel great about our breakfast of oatmeal, yogurt, and fruit while disregarding the doughnuts we munched on. We also tend to remember the big stuff while overlooking impulse decisions, such as taking a piece of candy from the bowl at the office each time we walk by... and we walk by it 15 times a day!

So? What do we do with this journal information?

First off, I would recommend approaching nutritional change through baby steps. Small changes, one at a time, over time, will most likely result in better decision making and long term adaptation to lifestyle habits.

Let's use the sample listings in the previous post, for example. 

In the first journal listing, a few opportunities jump right off the page; and to get yourself started, only pick ONE:

  • Eliminate one of the two Glazed Doughnuts - Equates to 1,344 calories per week
  • Exchange a small order of French Fries in place of the large size. - 1,960 calories per week
  • Replace either the Large Soft Drink or the Can of Soda for a water (you'll see huge results by eliminating all soft drinks) - potential of 3,010 calories per week
  • Only have 1 Chocolate Chip Cookie rather than 2 - Equates to 700 calories per week

These results assume one eats these, or comparable foods, each day.  However, it drives home the impact of one small tweak. 

Just like increasing weight or reps when exercise becomes easy, once you've managed your first change, then move on to another. 

This way, we are controlling our change without the feeling like we're depriving ourselves. As you see from the examples above, even a small change can equate to some pretty big numbers over a week's time. 


Bear in mind, the information I've provided is an example on how to effectively change nutritional habits, and not meant as a recommended nutrition plan for any particular goal. Please consult your doctor or a licensed nutritionist for more information on the specifics of nutrition that meets your individual needs.